Paying for support (what we charge)

Charging for residential care

If after your needs assessment it’s decided that residential care is the best way to meet your eligible needs, we may ask you to pay a contribution towards the cost. 

The amount you pay will be calculated in accordance with the council’s charging policy for Adult Social Care Services. The council's charging policy ccomplies with the Care Act 2014 which aims to provide a reasonable and equitable charging framework for all service users.

 The amount we ask you to contribute will depend on your income (including benefits) and capital, such as savings and any other assets you own such as property 

What happens during a financial assessment?

The financial assessor may need to see proof of your income and savings, so please have this information available, for example, saving account books, benefit books, bank statements and share certificates. You can have a relative, friend or other representative with you during the assessment.

We will write to you after the assessment and tell you how much you will be asked to pay. We will re-assess you each year to re-calculate the amount. If your circumstances change before the year is up, we may ask to make a re-assessment.

Self-funders

If you have more than £23,250 in savings and assets (including your home) you will be classed as a self-funder and expected to meet the full cost of your care.  If you're a self funder you may also be eligible for deferred payment .

We’ll also need to be satisfied that you, a family member or representative, can make the contractual arrangements with the care home you have chosen. We are happy to help you find a care home.

If, in the future, you need help paying your bills, we will carry out a new assessment to find out if you qualify for financial support from the council.

Deprivation of capital

This means that you have intentionally decreased your amount of capital, such as savings, to avoid or reduce care contributions. You might have given away a lump sum of cash or transferred a property to someone else. If the  Council suspects that this has been done to avoid paying for care you might be assessed as still holding this asset or the third party who now holds the asset may become liable for part of your contribution.  

What if I don’t agree with how much you ask me to pay?

If you do not feel that you should pay the amount requested, either because you think that it has been wrongly calculated or because you cannot afford the payments, we’ll arrange a review to look at whether the charging policy has been applied correctly.

If after the review you still aren’t happy with any aspect of the decision you may use the council’s complaints procedure.   

What happens if my financial circumstances change?

If your circumstances change you should contact the financial assessments team who will check that you are paying the right amount. A yearly review of the amount you pay will also be carried out when benefit rates change.

Can I refuse to have a financial assessment?

If you don’t want a financial assessment you’ll be classed as a self-funder. We’ll write to you to explain the charges.

More information 

Read more detailed information regarding funding arrangements for care homes.

 

Independent financial advice 

The  society for later life advisers can provide independent advice to anyone who may require care and support.

Sources  of Further Information 

The Care Act 2014 and its accompanying Regulations and the Care and Support Statutory Guidance can all be accessed through the gov.uk website. The Care and Support Statutory Guidance includes specific chapters on the subject of charging, together with more detailed guidance in Annexes A – F. 

The Council’s charging Policy provides information regarding the financial assessment process for both residential and non residential care services.  This can be found here 

Age Concern factsheet 40 provides some useful information regarding  deprivation of assets. All Age concern Fact sheets are available to the public.